Please disable your adblock and script blockers to view this page.

Hester and Chillingworth each pity the other. For what does she say he pities Hester and for what does Hester pity him?


Hester pities Chillingworth “for the hatred that has transformed a wise and just man to a fiend!” (126). He has grown so corrupt and perverse, that he can barely be called a human being and can no longer function in any ethical way. Chillingworth pities Hester because he was not a sufficient lover for her, and if she had found one with enough passion before him, “this evil (would) have not been” (126). Chillingworth tells Hester, “I pity thee, for thy good that has been wasted in thy nature” (126).


More Questions

1. What change in Chillingworth’s appearance does Hester notice when she stops to speak to him?
2. Hester and Chillingworth each pity the other. For what does she say he pities Hester and for what does Hester pity him?
3. For what reason does Chillingworth try to persuade Hester not to reveal his identity to Dimmesdale?
4. What gesture of the Reverend Dimmesdale’s does Pearl repeatedly associate with her mother’s scarlet letter?